Africa history and deep questions about slavery

 

You want the truth? Can you handle the truth?Africa history and deep questions about slavery

@All, I have a few questions, about Africa, although, I am not in the mood for emotional outrage or verbal combat.

1. Were Africans, active participants in the slave trade?

2. Was the slave trade used as a source of economic wealth back then?

3. Were the government or kingdoms of the day complicit in it?

4. Do we like to hear or read these parts of the history?

5. Are we really being dilligent for the longterm, by ignoring this part of our history?

6. Are there solutions to today’s cultural norms or issues that could be traced back to our history, and corrected from there?

7. Yes, indeed there are great parts of our history that foreign invaders tried to blot out to oppress us, but will we discern them, if we don’t know what was what. What was a spade to call it a spade?

 

I ask these 7 questions because i stumbled on some of our history, while investigating something completely different regarding our ancient kingdoms.

 

See the following extracts:

 

Extract 1:”Therefore the battle for Lagos/Eko in 1850 andfinally the 1897 battle for Benin City was inenvitable. Some historians intended to see the battle for Lagos/Eko as a Kosoko and Akintoye affair. It was actually a battle between Britain on one hand and Benin/Portuguese onthe other .

 

Kosoko was vehemently anti-British and pro slave trade ,because of theactivities of the British missionaries in Abeokuta and their support forAkintoye influnced by Madam Tinubu, who was herself a great slave trader.In the end Britain and Akintoye/Madam Tinubu won and Kosoko/Benin lost..Kosovo took to flight and hunted from place by British agents, his secondson OLOJO ended up in Benin City just before the British invasion. Olojowas arrested by the Benin soldiers as a spy for the British, since he spokeyoruba and came from Lagos.

http://ihuanedo.ning.com/profiles/blogs/beninedo-influence-before-the?xg_source=activity

 

Extract 2:Ulsheimer also gives us the first account, documenting the transformation of Lagos from fishing camp to a trading centre, and from an autonomous settlement to a Benin tributary. Lagos Lagoon was known to European traders by 1485, when it first appeared on maps, but the town of Lagos was not included. Nor was it mentioned by Portuguese and later Dutch merchants who were trading in the area with the Ijebu in cloth, slaves and ivory by15192 Oral evidence indicates that the Portuguese were sufficiently interested in the trade in this area to have established themselves in the Ijada quarter of Ijebu-Ode. But their written documents as those of other foreign traders are silent concerning a town of Lagos for most of the sixteenth century.

http://www.enownow.com/chat/story.php?sno=5707

 

Extract 3: (Son of an Igbo Chief kidnapped and sold by his own, he later said, his yearned to be like the SLAVES in his own country.)

 

Olaudah Equiano was born in Essaka, an Igbo village in the kingdom of Benin (now Nigeria) in 1745. His father was one of the province’s elders who decided disputes. According to James Walvin “Equiano described his father as a local Igbo eminence and slave owner”.

 

When he was about eleven, Equiano was kidnapped and after six months of captivity he was brought to the coast where he encountered white men for the first time. Equiano later recalled in his autobiography, The Life of Olaudah Equiano the African (1787): “The first object which saluted my eyes when I arrived on the coast, was the sea, and a slave ship, which was then riding at anchor, and waiting for its cargo. These filled me with astonishment, which was soon converted into terror, when I was carried on board. I was immediately handled, and tossed up to see if I were sound, by some of the crew; and I was now persuaded that I had gotten into a world of bad spirits, and that they were going to kill me. Their complexions, too, differing so much from ours, their long hair, and the language they spoke, (which was very different from any I had ever heard) united to confirm me in this belief. Indeed, such were the horrors of my views and fears at the moment, that, if ten thousand worlds had been my own, I would have freely parted with them all to have exchanged my condition with that of the meanest slave in my own country.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Sequiano.htm

 

Lastly, before, any one attempts to discredit this as spun by white media or historians too, becareful, because there is a thread with implicating information which should not surprise us at all, the evidence is still very much around us on the ground and in our culture.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151372346419878&set=a.10150407679609878.411215.628199877&type=1

You want the truth? Can you handle the truth?

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Kehinde Oduntan
Kehinde Oduntan Talking about History….. I came across a tradition of origin of the Oduduwa dynasty …… Any comments please…… I crave your indulgence Greg Ekhator.. See More

March 16, 2014 at 1:35pm · Edited ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Kehinde Oduntan, i purposefully have kept this link for yonks now, to iron out issues such as the yoruba version of the same story, you have just told us.. There is also a wealth of other historical gems to be learnt there:
https://m.facebook.com/greg…/posts/10151636732844878…

Greg Ekhator shared Brisbourne Iyamu‘s photo.

I have always known that Eko (Camp) is a bini word, and badagry, and even Republic of Benin, were all part of the Benin Empire.
However, was that also not part 

See More

March 16, 2014 at 4:04pm ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere I believe the ijaw’s version.

March 16, 2014 at 4:37pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Henry Obukohwo Omorere, Please do tell us the Ijaw’s version of the same story?

March 16, 2014 at 8:51pm ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere

Henry Obukohwo Omorere Greg…. there are several academic articles on this but on a quick mind freshere you may check this non academic perspective; http://ancestralvoices.tumblr.com/…/ijaw-people-of…

Ijaw people of Bayelsa,Nigeria performing their ancestral/spiritual…
ANCESTRALVOICES.TUMBLR.COM

March 16, 2014 at 10:02pm ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere I tend to believe that cos i am from the lineage of the Akassa as that has always been passed on to generations that originally my forebears were from present day bayelsa but then they tell younger generations that they were from originally Rivers state…. its a traditions watered down or destroyed by undocumented sources

March 16, 2014 at 10:06pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Henry Obukohwo Omorere, Hmmmm!
Oduduwa again is the critical link between us all!
The question then is why him?

March 16, 2014 at 10:49pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator And then again in Rivers state you have the Ikhuere people, who have been distinctly identified as having Benin lineage…. So we have so much more of our history to unravel…and publish…
Postmodernist Victor Nwobike

March 16, 2014 at 10:52pm ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere Greg… I really believe the Ijaw version because acient migration lend credence to how people migrated along the nile region basically along coastal regions…, my ancentral name is Akassa with its origin in present day Bayelsa. By searching my lineage in Delta… I have reason to believe the historical oral evidence as Akassa is alien and with no Urhobo meaning in my present day homeland.

March 16, 2014 at 11:24pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Henry Obukohwo Omorere, but wait oo!
Migration along the nile region, doesn;t lead to west coastal regions of Africa, rather the migration path of through Nubia (ancient Sudan), then to lake chad areas, then down south thru what comprises Edo will be the natural logical migration path…. before getting to the western or South south part of present day 9ja!! Wouldn’t u also agree Kehinde Oduntan ??

March 16, 2014 at 11:36pm ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere Greg you are right with the nubian migration pathway but dont forget that Nigerian history has been subverted by the major tribes to their own advantage… most of the kings you see today barely have historical roots of royalty farther 17th century…. Also the landscape in ijawland lend credence to how such nubian migration may have instigated further inquest into other settlements.

March 17, 2014 at 12:01am ·

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Kehinde Oduntan
Kehinde Oduntan Greg Ekhator .. I am cynical about the Nubian migration theory for a number of reasons apart from the fact that the only evidence that exist is oral tradition that has no definite time frame… . What proven cultural similarities have been established for instance…. I

March 17, 2014 at 12:36am · Edited ·

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Greg Ekhator

Greg Ekhator Kehinde Oduntan, not really, the geographical locations and shared language distribution is archaelogical history. We can’t change the archaelogical history although we can deny it.

There are som3e w words in Bini, that are in Yoruba and Ijaw, and Igbo, more in Benin and Yoruba, much more in Benin and Urthobo, and of course Urhobo and Ijaw share a lot of words i think, mixed with diluted igbo, (or something).

March 17, 2014 at 12:39am · Edited ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere Kehinde Oduntan, if u visit british museum – home to stolen historical artefacts, u will be shocked at the wealth of preserved nubian items or practices that we still do practice even today right before ur eyes… the burial ceremonies, the marriage tradition even the clay plates for warming soup

March 17, 2014 at 12:42am ·

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Kehinde Oduntan
Kehinde Oduntan …yes I was about to say the works of art ..And the technology…

March 17, 2014 at 12:48am · Edited ·

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Lawrence Adu
Lawrence Adu Greg Ekhator, Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr, of Havard School African Studies answered these questions in his documentary that was shown in PBS in American. He did an extensive research on the subject, and his journey took him to Badagry and other towns in West Africa.

March 17, 2014 at 12:51am ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere Lawrence thats fascinating and what did he say?

March 17, 2014 at 12:56am ·

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Lawrence Adu
Lawrence Adu He concluded that Africans were accomplices and that it was commerce and voluntary.

March 17, 2014 at 1:05am ·

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Kehinde Oduntan
Kehinde Oduntan Lawrence Adu…. You are talking about slavery and the slave trade? Eventually yes…. Initially it was not I believe…

March 17, 2014 at 1:10am ·

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Kehinde Oduntan
Kehinde Oduntan … We are also talking about the traditions of origin of our people…….

March 17, 2014 at 1:11am ·

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Kehinde Oduntan
Kehinde Oduntan …. How it appears to be interwoven……..

March 17, 2014 at 1:12am ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere ok. .. sorry to deviate but such logic by westerners is hypocritical? Are their own people not complicit in aiding fraud in Africa? They cry over 419 but receive stolen funds same way they deal in slavery with people who are ignorant or less literate bSee More

March 17, 2014 at 1:13am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Henry Obukohwo Omorere, i believe the blaming of the west and seeking reparation, further weakens the African, not strenthen the african.
Why?
Because, See More

March 17, 2014 at 1:22am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Lawrence, i agree with you, it was for commerce and voluntary.
We had been selling ourselves way before the british came. We traded especially with the portuguese, conquered territories and sold off the stubborn ones of the captives as slaves.
I know tSee More

March 17, 2014 at 1:27am ·

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Greg Ekhator

March 17, 2014 at 1:28am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Exactly my point, but i had not gotten my facts from Prof. Gates

March 17, 2014 at 1:28am ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere Greg… Thats very true. You see, the westerners are very good at one thing – they can observe an object or situation then creatively develop it further to solve evolving or current problems e.g take a look at the foldable bicycle…. the african is contented with a problem until a hard kick to the arse

March 17, 2014 at 1:29am ·

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Lawrence Adu
Lawrence Adu You welcome. It was a two part series that was about 2 hours long. It was very informative.

March 17, 2014 at 1:29am ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere Lawrence who is funding the Prof’s reseaches? I wonder why PBS will be quick to highlight these but play down some truth about slavery…. if it was commercial at that time… why are some countries like italy and france paying reparation but America is funding excuses?

March 17, 2014 at 1:34am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator I have to go look for the part 2, history is very important to me…. it hides the secret of states craft according to Winston Churchill

March 17, 2014 at 1:34am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Henry Obukohwo Omorere, GBAAAAM!
Just like the Boko haram, corruption, unemployment problem. As happening now!
Until people start dying like flies, we won’t even collectively unite to solve our problems.See More

March 17, 2014 at 1:36am ·

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Lawrence Adu
Lawrence Adu @Henry, it is not really who is funding the Professor. I do not know who is funding the professor but if our professors in Africa have a contrary view they should publish it.

March 17, 2014 at 1:36am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Henry Obukohwo Omorere, ha ha ha ha
You are reminding me of this again!!
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151972187829878&set=a.10150407679609878.411215.628199877&type=3&theater

Image may contain: text

Greg Ekhator

CAN SOMEONE EXPLAIN THIS TO ME, OR CAN SOMEONE TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR THIS OUTCOME, WITHOUT BLAMING OTHERS?

March 17, 2014 at 1:38am ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere Make the Prof relocate to Nigeria… preferably to the ijaw creeks…. when mosquito finish bite all him yanch e go thank heaven e great grand no make gra gra wen dem gbab am

March 17, 2014 at 1:38am ·

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Greg Ekhator

March 17, 2014 at 1:39am ·

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Lawrence Adu
Lawrence Adu @Henry, that is not really the essence of his studies as we all know. Take time to look for the series in Youtube and see where he is coming from.

March 17, 2014 at 1:41am · Edited ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator 6. Are there solutions to todays cultural norms or issues that could be traced back to our history, and corrected from there?
7. Yes they are great parts of our history that the white man tried to blot out to oppress us, but will we discern them if we don’t know what was our spade to call it a spade?

March 17, 2014 at 1:42am ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere I know where he is coming from… i just dont want him to get to where he is heading to. Tell America to join Italy and the rest to pay reparation and stop funding excuses

March 17, 2014 at 1:42am ·

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Lawrence Adu
Lawrence Adu @Henry, you are funny, but I feel you.

March 17, 2014 at 1:44am ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere No wonder Russia cited the Kossovo precedence to invade and annex Ukrain… Nigeria should invade and annex bakassi then cite the Russian precedence afterall na Nigerians villages dey all over there? Same logic in slavery

March 17, 2014 at 1:45am ·

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Lawrence Adu
Lawrence Adu @ Henry, Then face the wrath of France.

March 17, 2014 at 1:46am ·

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Henry Obukohwo Omorere
Henry Obukohwo Omorere Lawrence if you read my wall this morning… i lambast nigeria for condemning Russian incurssion becos that will weaken our interests with China – our main investor and ally … china is an ally of russia. it will weaken our influence in the security cSee More

March 17, 2014 at 1:53am · Edited ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator If we follow history and even until present day, especially in Africa. Wherever there is conflict (tribal or not)/WAR, there is slavery as a business symptom from captives and refugees. In other places they may have more sophisticated names, like human traffiking!!
CHECK THIS NEWSFLASH OUT
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AfV5PIAqkSQ

March 17, 2014 at 1:52am ·

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Lawrence Adu
Lawrence Adu @Greg, this slavery thing is a waste of manpower big time.

March 17, 2014 at 1:58am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Tell me about it, serious waste, to us, but a gain to those who bought the slaves!!!
America was built on the back of slaves, by the way, so was the egyptian pyramids

March 17, 2014 at 1:59am ·

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Lawrence Adu
Lawrence Adu It is a shame that people are still engaged in that inhumane trade.

March 17, 2014 at 2:03am ·

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Samuel Oviawe
Samuel Oviawe Am sorry that this thread is sliding away from what I believe Greg wanted at the beginning.: who are we, what roles did we play in the slave trade, WHAT LESSONS SHOULD WE LEARN TO POSITIVELY CHANGE OUR SITUATION. I was arrested until we started the blaming game. P lease let us refocus. Thanks.

March 17, 2014 at 4:29am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Good morning Samuel Oviawe, you are right!!
We seem to be hesitating to wrestle with that demon in our past, which as a result still somehow manifests in our present, in mutated forms!!See More

March 17, 2014 at 6:15am · Edited ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator My bro Lawrence Adu, i agree, but at the same time, thats an understatement!
Actually its an atrocity, that we are not outraged about it!!
For those people sold as slaves, – it will just be like the 21st century of what used to happen 200 to 500 years See More

March 19, 2014 at 5:57am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Not to talk about the Osu caste in Igbo land!!!
Where is the hyper-tribalist Odenigbo and his peeps?

March 19, 2014 at 5:58am ·

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Stephanie T Douglas
Stephanie T Douglas Interesting !

March 22, 2014 at 10:51am ·

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Fidelis Edosomwan
Fidelis Edosomwan IT IS OBVIOUS THAT HERE WERE LOCALS WHO BENEFITED FROM SLAVERY. TO THEM IT WAS ECONOMICS

March 22, 2014 at 7:18pm ·

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Dee Iles
Dee Iles I have not sort to research the information submitted on this thread, but from the brief submissions it appears as though we are looking for the source of this grotesque monstrosity that still affects our psyche in some shape or form in our daily liveSee More

March 22, 2014 at 8:33pm ·

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Abimbola Smith
Abimbola Smith Mr. Greg Ekhator, there were two types of slavery back then, one was known to be domestic slavery while the other one was known to be Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. Domestic Slavery which dates back to time immemorial has been existence before the other oSee More

March 22, 2014 at 10:08pm ·

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Abimbola Smith
Abimbola Smith Adjai Crowther, his mother and his siblings were bought nine times by different slave buyers before they were finally sold into Trans-Atlantic Slavery…

March 22, 2014 at 10:23pm ·

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Greg Ekhator

March 22, 2014 at 10:27pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Doc Fidelis, yes sir, its supposed to be obvious, but it very rarely mentioned. Actually its never mentioned before, apart from this one in this old newspaper … lol
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151372346419878&set=a.10150407679609878.411215.628199877&type=1&theater&notif_t=like

No automatic alt text available.

Greg Ekhator with Henry Ifeanyi Denavi and 17 others.

WHAT DO YOU MAKE OF THIS??
100 YEARS AGO, THIS YEAR, THE SAME JUJU THAT WAS USED TO BIND SLAVES, IS STILL BEING USED TO BIND SEX SLAVES IN ITALY.
NOW LETS SEE HOW BRITISH BLAMERS, ARE GOING TO EXPLAIN THIS ONE????

March 22, 2014 at 10:30pm ·

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Abimbola Smith
Abimbola Smith In Rev. Samuel Johnson’s The History Of Yorubas From The Earliest Times…, the then Iyalode Of Ibadan alone was reputed to have over 2,500 slaves who worked for her as farmers, hence her stupendous wealth…

March 22, 2014 at 10:30pm ·

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Greg Ekhator

March 22, 2014 at 10:31pm ·

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Abimbola Smith
Abimbola Smith Oga Greg, the most annoying thing was that, it was all about trade by barter…a slave(human being) could be exchanged for goat, a small piece of mirror, a mat, ogogoro(gin) etc…

March 22, 2014 at 10:35pm ·

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Abimbola Smith
Abimbola Smith Oga Greg have read the book, A Patriot To The Core written by the erudite historian, Prof. J. F. Ade-Ajayi?

March 22, 2014 at 10:44pm ·

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Dee Iles
Dee Iles I will not deny my mild irritation concerning this sensitive subject. I look upon it as a curse of a Black man by a Black man or if you prefare an African curse initiated by our ancestors and exploited by Biblical proportions by the Caucasian man. What is even more unpalatable is such evil initiators are celebrated in today’s Nigerian politics. I am also well aware the same can be said of other African nations.

March 22, 2014 at 10:52pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Abimbola Smith, indeed, it is pathetic!!
No i haven’t read the book by prof. Ade-Ajayi…..
I will have to get me a copy

March 22, 2014 at 11:01pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Deemoni Iles, you not alone oo!!
Wondering if such actions of selling ourselves brings a curse on the collective people, which is even according to our african culture….
Actually usurping any resource and misappropriapriation of funds or energy, natuSee More

March 22, 2014 at 11:06pm ·

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Abimbola Smith
Abimbola Smith Oga Greg, abeg no vex ooo, when it comes to the issue of history, no sleep could tie me down, i have already beckoned on insomnia to come and partner with me. I’m always in my element whenever and wherever history is to be discussed. I love history with passion and garrulously…

March 22, 2014 at 11:09pm ·

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Dee Iles
Dee Iles My honorable friend Greg Ekhator you have hit the nail on the head. I often wonder why Naija is as it is and say hmmm in exasperation when I walk the streets. Something dey as our peps say. One cannot touch or see, but you know say it is like no other place on the continent or for that matter on the face of this earth!

March 22, 2014 at 11:24pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Yes my friend Deemoni Iles, i can sense the omen too!!!
Just today, i was pondering why our EGO is FRAGILE compared to other races.
You know like when you are hyper-sensitive when you have done something wrong, and wary of retribution. Because at the heart of all our problems is that Fragile Ego…. what caused it, and how have we been reinforcing it in our progeny through the years.

March 22, 2014 at 11:40pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator And for what benefit and why do some call this kind of reflecting analysis – “self-hating”
They benefit from it, because they use reverse psychology to feed the fragile ego!!!
The ego is the self, the numero uno instance of who and what we are.

March 23, 2014 at 12:00am · Edited ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Abimbola Smith, i love history!!! And i am beginning to love it more.
About 2 weeks ago i learned that Winston Churchill once said:
Study history, study history; in it lies the secret of statescraft!!!

March 22, 2014 at 11:46pm ·

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Dee Iles
Dee Iles Your last comment resonates on my thoughts. Churchill’s comments are quite thought provoking. However sourcing the history therein lays the sub-plot.

March 22, 2014 at 11:52pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator True!!

March 22, 2014 at 11:59pm ·

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Isqil Najim
Isqil Najim slavery is man made vocation. it is as exclusive to Africans as the europeans. the reason Africans feel more agrieved is that they were looted and exploited by vastly superior slave masters. without greed, Africans wouldn’t have fallen to the hands of See More

March 31, 2014 at 7:28am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Isqil, wow! very succinctly put! There is definitely something attitudinal about Africans & slavery

March 31, 2014 at 9:45am · Edited ·

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Isqil Najim
Isqil Najim it is in our blood… the west only brought out the beast in us… they didnt plant it there

March 31, 2014 at 11:53am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator GBAAAM

March 31, 2014 at 4:04pm ·

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Greg Ekhator

April 2, 2014 at 11:25am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Please tag any historians on here, passionate students of history like me.
Actually i recall Ojealaro Friday

April 9, 2014 at 9:27am ·

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Elderstatesman Ojealaro Friday
Elderstatesman Ojealaro Friday I have read your post but the context you provided for the answers you seek is not sufficient to answer the very wide questions you asked. My problem is that you tend to limit African history and her relationship with slavery to contemporary era as recent as 15th century or so. No,Africa history must start from the Egyptian, Ethiopia, Yemen, Nubia civilization. States that predated the European kingdoms.

April 9, 2014 at 8:11pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Ojealaro Friday, actually I went further back to Egyptian times! including dt d pyramids were built with slave labour! Nevertheless please give the depth of history u feel this deserves as one persons version surely can’t be comprehensive enough?

April 9, 2014 at 8:36pm ·

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Elderstatesman Ojealaro Friday
Elderstatesman Ojealaro Friday Ok… I will provide my opinions based on recorded history…brb.

April 9, 2014 at 8:39pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Ojealaro Friday, we are still awaiting your submission with baited breathe ooo! 😉

April 26, 2014 at 12:54am ·

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Pride Osayamwen
Pride Osayamwen Interesting read / comments. Slavery itself is a cycle, and I believe it comes with our natural instincts to fight for survival. The strong will control the weak and that’s our reality. The slavery cycle that caught up with us at the receiving end in See More

April 26, 2014 at 5:12am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator @Pride, thanks for you insightful comments. Let those who have ears! HEAR!

April 26, 2014 at 7:07am ·

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Elderstatesman Ojealaro Friday
Elderstatesman Ojealaro Friday The recorded oldest primogenitor of the negroes was Cush the grandson of Biblical Noah. Before him we have only the yellow skinned( now pronounced as Arab,India and Indian colors) people who were his ancestors and contemporary brethren. It is also on rSee More

April 26, 2014 at 8:32am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Ojealaro Friday, my bro thank you so very much for your submission, i am almost calling it erudite, however i would be remiss in saying that, as you haven’t supplied any references for further study!! ??
Thanks either way as this thought provoking …. and has versions of the same story i haven’t heard before. I am pretty sure i am not alone on this?

April 26, 2014 at 8:46am · Edited ·

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Elderstatesman Ojealaro Friday
Elderstatesman Ojealaro Friday Greg, you no hear Wetin I write for the comment? We are priests. We get revelations direct. We are the references ourselves…lol just kidding. Don’t worry, I will supply the links and sources but don’t tell me that you don’t know that the Bible mentioned some of the things in my comment.

April 26, 2014 at 11:40am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Yeah yeah, i know of the biblical references, thats what got me ultra interested too

April 26, 2014 at 11:41am ·

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Cecil Nosa Omoruyi
Cecil Nosa Omoruyi ALL I WILL CALL IT IS BACKSLIDING OF INTREST OR AGREEMENT SIGNED WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF WHO EVER HAS BEEN AFFECTED WITH FORM THE PAST TILL NOW. IT IS AN ACT OF OVERPOWERING THOSE INVOLVED WITHOUT PROPER CONSENT. SOSee More

September 27, 2014 at 5:10pm ·

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Dineo Meko
Dineo Meko 1, 2, 3 = yes. 4=no. and the rest debatable. in Ghana, kids are as young as 6/7 yrs old are sold to other families as housemaids especially in Ho, Volta region and Tamale region commits serious human rights in Trafficking children RIGHT NOW as I type.See More

April 26, 2015 at 8:28am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Thank you so much Princess Dineo Meko II, there is so much work to be done, so much enlightenment to be had, to get us Africans from collectively stop shooting our selves in the foot.
Let me invite my friend Dame Modupe Debbie Ariyo who runs an NGO for protecting African children from such horrors, perhaps she can help us. (y)

April 26, 2015 at 2:13pm · Edited ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Deep questions capable of resetting world view!

May 16, 2016 at 9:04am ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Thanks again Elderstatesman Ojealaro Friday
Just re-reading your submission after 2 years. (y)
Feel free to add more information if you have it bro?

May 17, 2016 at 3:01pm ·

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Elderstatesman Ojealaro Friday
Elderstatesman Ojealaro Friday Oga Greg Ekhator, this was a very enlightening thread. Topics like these are far better that the fruitless political ones that continue yo task our attention. These are the things we should discuss more often bro.

May 17, 2016 at 3:09pm ·

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Greg Ekhator
Greg Ekhator Precisely bro, its going to be tall order to orientate the focus of our people on this, as they seem focused on the near term gain issues, rather than longterm.
Foresight is the koko of the matter.

May 17, 2016 at 3:18pm · Edited ·

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